SpaceX launches webcasts

Sindar
Akatsuki

I am a big fan of space exploration, so these reusable rockets are a music to my ears xD Does anyone else here watch SpaceX webcasts? [Only registered and activated users can see links Click here to register], [Only registered and activated users can see links Click here to register], @Davis? 

Here is the recording of the most recent webcast, the launch was made last night:

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MadaraUchiha
Akatsuki

Interesting. I haven't watched any of these, though.

" Justice is subject to dispute; might is easily recognized and is not disputed. So we cannot give might to justice, because might has gainsaid justice, and has declared that it is she herself who is just. And thus, being unable to make what is just strong, we have made what is strong just."
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BurnsyCEO
NBF member

I follow space X loosely when they make big announcements/plans. Like with their BFR rocket, mars colonization etc but not for the little things like every rocket they launch. Yes even I'm a big fan of space exploration. To be honest this is one of the best times to be a fan with all the new frontiers being challenged and with renewed interest in going back to the moon and mars after the 50 or so years of doing nothing. Not to mention a private company being able to launch their own rockets at a fraction of the price of the old rockets.

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Sindar
Akatsuki

(10-13-2017, 04:02 AM)MadaraUchiha Wrote: Interesting. I haven't watched any of these, though.

They are pretty interesting. They look long, but if you skip to launch, it would be a packed sequence of events for a few minutes, ending with the first stage landing, and then you can stop watching or skip to the last few minutes of the video for the satellite deployment. I found it really interesting when I watched their launches the first few times, allows you to see how these things work.

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MadaraUchiha
Akatsuki

(10-14-2017, 01:21 AM)Sindar Wrote: They are pretty interesting. They look long, but if you skip to launch, it would be a packed sequence of events for a few minutes, ending with the first stage landing, and then you can stop watching or skip to the last few minutes of the video for the satellite deployment. I found it really interesting when I watched their launches the first few times, allows you to see how these things work.


Well, I have seen those edited launch videos here and there, actually. It's just that I haven't seen full-length videos like these.

" Justice is subject to dispute; might is easily recognized and is not disputed. So we cannot give might to justice, because might has gainsaid justice, and has declared that it is she herself who is just. And thus, being unable to make what is just strong, we have made what is strong just."
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Sindar
Akatsuki

(10-13-2017, 08:07 AM)BurnsyCEO Wrote: I follow space X loosely when they make big announcements/plans. Like with their BFR rocket, mars colonization etc but not for the little things like every rocket they launch. Yes even I'm a big fan of space exploration. To be honest this is one of the best times to be a fan with all the new frontiers being challenged and with renewed interest in going back to the moon and mars after the 50 or so years of doing nothing. Not to mention a private company being able to launch their own rockets at a fraction of the price of the old rockets.
Right. BFR seems to be the best thing that can realistically happen to the industry. Huge fully reusable rocket, sounds too good to be true =) Just year ago people were saying that reusable second stage is completely unrealistic. I hope BFR would actually be developed, even the new slimmer design is still quite a challenge.

Are you gonna watch their attempt to launch Falcon Heavy later this year though? I'd really like to catch it live.

Btw, besides SpaceX there is this pretty exciting NASA robotics program, the one that produces Valkyrie humanoid robot. I feel like Musk will need these things if he is actually gonna build an autonomous base on Mars, and so far the only realistic way to do it is with NASA and their research affiliates. I don't know if anybody in NASA takes Musk's plans for 2022 BFR first flight to Mars seriously, but even if it is pushed back to 2024 they better start preparing their robots for this trip now, cause robotics R&D is pretty slow.

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BurnsyCEO
NBF member

Are you gonna watch their attempt to launch Falcon Heavy later this year though? 

Probably not.

Btw, besides SpaceX there is this pretty exciting NASA robotics program, the one that produces Valkyrie humanoid robot. I feel like Musk will need these things if he is actually gonna build an autonomous base on Mars.


Theres no way we're sending humanoid robots for any practical applications yet. Waaay to inefficient at doing simple tasks that a specialized robot can do 10x better. They're even bulkier, more expensive and more prone to failure. I never heard of this bot before but it looks like a publicity thing.

I don't know if anybody in NASA takes Musk's plans for 2022 BFR first flight to Mars seriously

Even if he doesn't make it we forgive him. It's exponentially harder to get people to mars than the moon which most people don't know. Having to deal with 9 month travel time, creating a portable sustainable habitat, 9 months of 0G just to get there. Then having to live there for many months because of launch windows being a thing and so you can't just leave when you want to go home. Building structures, doing science, growing plants, bringing your return food/fuel/rockets with you.Etc

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Sindar
Akatsuki

(10-14-2017, 06:08 AM)BurnsyCEO Wrote: Are you gonna watch their attempt to launch Falcon Heavy later this year though? 

Probably not.

Btw, besides SpaceX there is this pretty exciting NASA robotics program, the one that produces Valkyrie humanoid robot. I feel like Musk will need these things if he is actually gonna build an autonomous base on Mars.


Theres no way we're sending humanoid robots for any practical applications yet. Waaay to inefficient at doing simple tasks that a specialized robot can do 10x better. They're even bulkier, more expensive and more prone to failure. I never heard of this bot before but it looks like a publicity thing.

I don't know if anybody in NASA takes Musk's plans for 2022 BFR first flight to Mars seriously

Even if he doesn't make it we forgive him. It's exponentially harder to get people to mars than the moon which most people don't know. Having to deal with 9 month travel time, creating a portable sustainable habitat, 9 months of 0G just to get there. Then having to live there for many months because of launch windows being a thing and so you can't just leave when you want to go home. Building structures, doing science, growing plants, bringing your return food/fuel/rockets with you.Etc
I think there is a case to be made for humanoid robots, or walking machines in general. There aren't any roads on the Moon or Mars, the infrastructure would have to be suitable for humans (who also use bipedal walking) in either case, etc. The main question is whether or not we can finally make these robots work reliably. Of course, having different types of robots would probably be better still.

I don't think anyone should take the manned missions plans seriously yet xD We will have to be able to produce propellant on Mars before we can send people there, which means dozens of robotic missions first. The first few BFR missions to Mars will just stay there, they won't be able to return to Earth at all. Musk was talking about building a solar array there, which I think is a good goal for a few missions. That is one of the reasons I think NASA should start to plan their participation in Musk's missions, their help would be needed to making building this solar array possible.

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BurnsyCEO
NBF member

(10-15-2017, 12:16 AM)Sindar Wrote: I think there is a case to be made for humanoid robots, or walking machines in general. There aren't any roads on the Moon or Mars, the infrastructure would have to be suitable for humans (who also use bipedal walking) in either case, etc. The main question is whether or not we can finally make these robots work reliably. Of course, having different types of robots would probably be better still.

I don't think anyone should take the manned missions plans seriously yet xD We will have to be able to produce propellant on Mars before we can send people there, which means dozens of robotic missions first. The first few BFR missions to Mars will just stay there, they won't be able to return to Earth at all. Musk was talking about building a solar array there, which I think is a good goal for a few missions. That is one of the reasons I think NASA should start to plan their participation in Musk's missions, their help would be needed to making building this solar array possible.

There are many advantages to using wheels right now. Walking technology just isn't there yet to compete with the simple reliable and energy efficiency wheels provide. Not to mention even if they fail a motor they're still useful. The terrain on both the worlds are easily traversable with wheels.

I guess they'll find a solution shouldn't be unrealistic for them to work together.

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